The courage to heal

The courage to heal

Energy healing as a profession takes a slightly thick skin in that it is regarded with skepticism or fear by so many people.

Wikipedia is convinced that it is quackery. And most likely, so are some of your closest and most respected teachers, friends and family.

It’s not the kind of career greeted by most parents with cries of joy, a bottle of champagne, and unsolicited offers of money.

Devoutly spiritual people of all faiths (who you resonate with as kindred spirits a lot of the time) regard you as a servant of the devil at worst, and at best as a foolish dupe for dark forces and delusion.

Then once you have given up on social approval and status, the next attachment is going to be to wealth. Quite frankly, if one in a thousand healers earns enough to support a family, that is a lot. The rest of us work practically for free or at a loss. 

This is for a number of reasons. It is undervalued (see above), which makes it a hard sell. Healers are not business people and in fact because we need to work without ego, as best as we can, makes it hard to become business savvy – but not impossible.

It also takes years of practice and study, and making of mistakes, and peering back into the abyss and so on and so forth. 

And then there is the the fact that it is mostly one on one, very intense work, which means you have to value your time at a professional level in order to get realistic about the cost of your labor. By now, if you haven’t been swept off your feet by a rich partner, you are on someone else’s couch or living in a small shack somewhere obscure and far from the market. Or you have joined the living dead and have a full time day job that relegates your healing work to a weekend hobby.

Alright, so you accept that you may have to give up on worldly success… So what about the deep sense of satisfaction to be gained from knowing you have saved another human being from sickness, misery or death?

We-ell, about that…

Even the most miraculously gifted of healers out there have no control over the outcome of their work. 

We can get a feel for the way things are going. Occasionally if we are very very lucky a bright light and a voice will tell us what is going down. But you can basically guarantee that this will come as a great surprise to all parties.

Usually (although of course not always), terminally ill clients are greatly helped, but still terminal. Sickness comes and goes according to the body, mind and karma of the client.

So what is the point of all this dedication and commitment then?

Well, the thing is that a good healing session is mindblowingly beautiful to give and receive. An everyday good migraine removal is such a joy when it works. Seeing and feeling the pain leave someone’s face to be replaced by wonder and relief. Even if the migraine stays, the session helps.

When I receive healing for my chronic stubborn unchangingly pigheaded illness, it always feels so good. It feels like my soul is being greeted and nourished. It’s so soothing, and the symptoms lift somewhat for minutes, hours or days – potluck unfortunately.

And then an amazing knock-your-socks off mini-enlightenment healing is so incredible. Not only is there the chance to go into remission for a few years, but the nature of reality seems to come apart and be put back together into a more beautiful, kinder, happier world. And this transformation tends to be lasting – it stays with you forever in one way or another.

The thing is, both the healer and the client share in these delights. 

After a few of these experiences you tend to believe that everyone else in the world wants to be a healer too.

And then the path is not about courage but about noticing the best treasure in the world hidden in plain sight all along…

3 comments / Add your comment below

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  2. It is great to be of service to humanity. It’s really not a job but a calling. I love that you are honest about your experiences. You aren’t trying to prove that things work or don’t work. I think it’s important for people to know that benefit isn’t always in the format imagined.

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